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The following data about pedestrian collisions in the five boroughs of New York has been compiled to help you reach your destination safely.

You can click on a particular borough above and drill down to see pedestrian collision trends in that area.

Pedestrian Collisions (Year to Date)

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Current Most Dangerous Intersections for Pedestrians in Manhattan:

  1. 1

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  2. 3

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  3. 5

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  4. 7

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  5. 9

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  6. 2

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  7. 4

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  8. 6

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  9. 8

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

  10. 10

    ( collisions in the last year to date)

Make Your City Safer

Encourage your city officials to make safety updates to these dangerous intersections by contacting the NYC Department of Transportation.

Click the button to the right to go to the DOT contact page. Once there, select "safety improvements" as the general topic, and "street or sidewalk" as the kind of place.

New York lowered the speed limit to 25 miles per hour in late 2014 to reduce traffic collision deaths. The number of pedestrian incidents dropped in all five boroughs in the first three months of 2015 compared to the same period a year earlier, before the new speed limit took effect. Brooklyn had the highest number of pedestrian collisions during the first quarter of 2015, averaging 235 per month.

VS
30mph (2013-2014)
Speed Limit
25mph (2015-2016)

Collision Trends:

Time of Day VS. Day of Week

Collisions occur more often at certain times of day and days of the week, making them the most dangerous travel times for pedestrians.


Pedestrian collisions in New York happen more frequently when more people are on the street. The data show that the weekday afternoon and evening hours see a large number of pedestrian accidents. The weekday morning commute is also a common time for accidents. The rush hour collision trend is most pronounced in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens.

Weekends are also a hazardous time to walk in New York. Friday and Saturday evenings are frequently among the most dangerous times for pedestrian collisions.

Collision Trends in 2015:

Age VS. Gender

Across all boroughs, males were generally more likely to be victims of pedestrian collisions than women in recent years.


Elderly pedestrians who are members of the “Greatest Generation” and baby boomers are involved in more pedestrian collisions than younger people such as millennials and members of Generation X. Queens had the highest number of pedestrian collisions involving the Greatest Generation and Staten Island had the fewest. Brooklyn had the highest number of pedestrian collisions involving Baby Boomers and members of Generation X.

Collision Trends:

Type of Vehicle

Cars are often referred to as “passenger vehicles,” and far exceed any other type of vehicle in New York. Cars are also most commonly involved in collisions with pedestrians across the five boroughs. Sport utility vehicles and station wagons are typically the second most common type of vehicle in collisions.

Manhattan usually has by far the highest number of taxicabs involved in pedestrian collisions.

Collision Trends:

Main Contributing Factor

The numbers fluctuate somewhat by borough over time, but throughout New York two factors are usually responsible for the most pedestrian collisions. Distracted driving is usually a factor in about a third of collisions. Failure to yield the right of way typically contributes to about a quarter of incidents.

Click or hover over each section in the pie chart to view more detail.

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